Charging Station

In my house, we charge all of the devises between the couches. The chords are unsightly! So I had to do something about it. Here I make a charging station that fits in with my decor!

 

  1. Buy a box with  lid that will close and stay closed when sat upright. I found a bread box at target with a magnetic lid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure to try out your box to ensure that it works. Leave open on a flat surface. If you return and find a cat in it, then it’s a good box.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Measure the box. The lid will be the front. Choose which way you want the door to open and mark the top and bottom (short ends).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Measure the plug.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. On the center of the bottom mark a spot to drill the hole for the chord. I have an 1 1/4-inch long-edge of my plug, so the hole was 1 1/2-inch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Mark four evenly spaced (or however many chords can charge at once) ticks on the front lid.

 

 

 

 

 

6. On the back of the box (opposite side of the door), mark two evenly spaced spots along the center. This is to affix the box to the wall.

 

 

 

 

7. DRILL HOLES! Or have your husband do it. It’s his tools, so I just give good instructions. Let’s be clear, I know how to use all of his tools, and am perfectly capable of using power tools. However, I stick to my tools and he sticks to his. . . .and the ones he has absorbed from me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Use screws to affix the box to the wall. Use a level to ensure the box is not uneven.

 

 

 

 

 

The finished product in use. Note that our chord has a hub that is plugged into it. There are two standard ports and two USB ports.

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Door Draft Blocker

I haven’t posted in a while, so let’s start this set of upcoming posts with a super useful item. A door draft blocker! I needed two for different reasons. First, the block the beer closet from getting dust, pet hair, and other items into the precious beer area. The second is to keep the kitty litter in the cat closet. Sometimes he is messy and gets the litter everywhere! Then we tread on it while walking down the hall, it’s the worst.

 

  1. Measure your doors! The beer door is 30-inches, the cat door is 24-inches and the width of both is 1 1/4-inches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cuts!

Length, is obviously just a bit longer than the length of the door. I did 26-inches on the brown, for the cat door and 34-inches on the gray for the beer door.

Width is 15 inches: 1/2 inch on each side for seams, 6 inches on each side for the stuffing and a middle section 2 inches long.

 

3. Seams: I  did the seams two different ways to see which I like better, time will tell.

 

For the gray I did a serger edge on each of the long lengths. Always finish serger seams with some fray check.

 

 

 

 

 

On the brown fabric I did a folded over seam. I ironed a 1/4-inch fold on each long edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Pin: Fold each side in on the long length. For the folded edge, ensure to keep the edge folded while pinning. I left an approximate 1-inch gap between the fabric.

 

 

 

 

On one of the short edges fold under the end to seal the end, leaving the other end free.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Sew. For the serger edge, sew at the inside edge of the serger thread. On the folded over edge give a little less than a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

 

 

 

 

 

Sew the folded under short edge closed.

 

 

 

 

 

6. Stuff and seal closed. The obvious stuffing material is the acrylic stuffing that you can buy from the store. I stuffed these with old clothes that weren’t going to make it to the thrift store. Always cut off buttons, take out zippers and save those!

 

 

 

 

 

7. Apply to the door.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In use on the beer closet:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In use on the cat closet.

 

   

Table Runner

My foyer table needed a new runner.

As an aside, I recently bought a house so be prepared for a large number of new posts as I fill it with my style.

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The planning stage of my table runner:

  • 5 quilt squares
  • extra fabric for the trim
  • know your dimensions!

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  1. Cut the fabric into 2-1/2 inch squares. There is n picture of this so here is a picture of one of my helpers:

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2. Line up the fabric right sides together but offset by a predetermined distance. I used 1-1/8 inch. This will give it the horizontal effect. Make sure each strip is off by the same amount.

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3. Sew the strips together. Ensure you keep a standard seam with. I used 1/4 inch.

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4. Keep sewing! You will have one long  . . . .long fabric piece.

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5. Iron so that all the seams lay in the same direction.

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6. Cut the fabric piece in half.

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7. Lay the right sides together and fold in half. Use the folded crease as a way to keep your fabric piece square. Line the crease along a line on your cutting board and then cut off the edges perpendicularly.

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8. You may have to square up the top edge again when you are done to ensure a nice rectangle.

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9. Cut batting to suit.

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10. Not shown: sew with the fabric pieces right sides together and batting on one side. Leave a gap in the seam so that you can flip the piece inside out.

11. Flatten the piece and then iron the edges flat.

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12. Create quilting lines: I did one seam along each white piece front and back. It turned out very nice.

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You can see the front and back here with the fabric folded.

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13. Cut your trim fabric in 3 inch wide lengths.

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14. Iron trim fabric in half.

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15. Sew the trim fabric to the edge of the fabric piece. The open edge of the trim should be in line with the outside edge of the piece. I did the long edges first.

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16. Before doing the trim on the short edges finish the long edges by folding the trim over the fabric piece and sewing down the side again.

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17. Next sew the trim on the short edge as done in step 15. Leave 2-3 inches on each side as extra. Also, start sewing just inside the trim for the long edges.

18. Now let’s set up our corners. Cut the fabric at an angle as shown below.

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Fold as shown:

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Flip the fabric piece.

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Fold over the long edge as shown:

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Fold over the short edge as shown:

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Pin your edges down and then do the final run along the short edge.

19. Now cut your thread and dab each end with some fray check.

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Clearly I was really making a cat blanket:

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Rand, the Dragon Reborn, thinks the new blanket is for him . . . .

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All done!

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On the table clutter free:

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The finished product looks AWESOME!

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Wedding Quilt

 

The plan:

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This quilt was planned for a wedding this past August. They both love Game of Thrones and the Elder Scrolls so I went with a medieval theme. The top right is the groom’s crest and bottom left is the bride’s crest. These field is split by a row of purple (a royal color) and wedding rings encircle the center.

Shopping!!!

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First I made the bride’s crest using my typical square patterns. The stars and half moon will be sewn on later.

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After these are laid out on the sewing room floor, I have to gather them up and label them to be stored for later.

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The same was done to the groom’s crest.

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The rings were a special problem. Here is how I did them. First sew two squares together diagonally, then cut the excess. For the purple squares, I just ironed them in half to get a good line.

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Then I took one of the “excess fabric” triangles that I just cut off and placed it on the gold side. I folded the fabric in half and ironed a line.

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I then flipped the free triangle and put a seam on the far side of the line.

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Iron it! Then line all the squares out. I had to do it twice for both rings, the diamond was sew on later.

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One side all sewn together ready for it’s accents.

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The half moon.

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The stars

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The other side all sewn together.

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The finished product on the recipient’s bed!

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Wedding Coozies

I am at the time in my life where all my friends are getting married and making babies. I’m at the tail end of weddings and engagement parties for the year. For 3 different couples I made these ‘his’ and ‘hers’ and ‘hers’ cozies for the engagement parties or welcome dinners.

Supplies:

  1. Black Quilt Fabric
  2. White Quilt Fabric
  3. Satin Fabric (I bought searching through the remnant bin, 1/2 off!)
  4. Lace Ribbon
  5. White Elastic
  6. Flowers
  7. Typical sewing supplies

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First determine dimensions. I cut the back side of each out of white and black; rectangles of 4-1/2 by 9-1/2 inches. The bride front was two white rectangles at 2-3/4 by 9-1/2. Then a skirt was cut at 3 -1/2 by 11.  The groom front were two panels, 4-1/2 by 5 and 4-1/2 by 5-1/2.

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To make the groom front I pinned the two panels together as shown below with a piece of white fabric as the “undershirt” – do not sew.

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For the bride front I first gave the skirt a hem on three sides by folding the edge over twice and sewing. Then I pinned the skirt between the two white panels giving it ruffles and make sure to keep it at least a half inch from the edge. These were sewn together with a 1/4 inch seam.              wpid-20150803_211146.jpg

For each the bride and groom the front was sewn to the back, right sides together. Be sure to pin in the skirt as shown below so it does not get caught up in the hem, and sew with a 1/4 inch seam leaving a 2-inch gap on one short side to be able to reverse the coozie.

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After the coozie is reversed, put the two elastic bands folded in half into the open section and pin. Then give it a hem around all 4 side, reinforce the elastic bands with another pass over that section. For the groom sew down the front along where it should still be pinned, the groom was done with black thread, it was the only time I had to switch thread. The final move is to sew buttons on the opposite side of the elastic.

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The veil was made with one zig-zag seam with the top of the ribbon folded over by a half inch. Then an elastic band was inserted in the loop, and sewn closed. Flowers were sewn along the front of the band. I also put a matching flower on the groom’s coozie in the pocket area.

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Final products shown on a bottle before flowers were sewn on.

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Final products shown on cans.

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Two of three couples that were recipients shown below. They loved it and that was the real purpose of making these!

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Fabric Coasters

I’ve been wanting to make coasters for some time now since the wooden coasters I got in Ecuador are falling apart.  You may think: “Can’t you just sew two pieces of fabric together and call it a day?” Well, no because then you still have condensation seepage through the fabric or heat transfer from a hot cup. I can do better than that.

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First I started with some 4 by 4 squares I had left over from various quilts or other projects. I had a few other small scraps of fabric that I cut into 4 by 4 squares. The fabric color choice was to have a set of multi colored coasters to use while gaming; each person in our group has their own game colors they use everytime. The colors are typically red, yellow, orange, blue, green, purple, and black depending on the game. I didn’t have any black scraps ready so I used dark blue. My typical color is blue which is prevalent in every game, Kyle is always orange but will settle for yellow. The coasters will prevent our game pieces or cards from getting wet when we have drinks while we game! The owls are just cute extra fabric I wanted to use up.

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Next I needed some insulation. I used left over fabric batting. Remember – Never throw anything out! These were small and oddly shaped pieces that I was able to cut into 4 by 4 squares.

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Batting still doesn’t account for the condensation issue. I need plastic! I’ve made these before with painters plastic and I prefer to use that. However my stash was out and right now I’m not buying new supplies unless needed. Instead I can upcycle some plastic bags!

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I tried my rotary cutter first and it worked! Shown below are the bags cut into 4 by 4 inch squares.

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Time to make sandwiches! Put the two fabric squares right sides together. Then lay a plastic square, insulation square, then plastic square on top and pin.

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Next sew the square around leaving a gap along one edge for flipping. Then cut off the extra trimmings and thread.

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Next flip your squares so that the fabric is on the outside.

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Pin the mouth shut.

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Sew around the outside edge. (For a wedding present I made some for a friend and I added a 2-inch square seam and it really popped. I’ve also done some with a spiral square seam pattern and that also looks really good. I imagine you can do all sorts of seam patterns to add extra zest to the coasters and to make them lie flatter.)

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Finally a finished product! The coasters work on hot and cold beverages.

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Note: Since there is plastic inside, do not use these as mini oven mitts. They are machine washable, but I’d let them air dry.

Spicing Up Our Pillows

Our couch is old, it has old pillows. But until we buy a house we’re not going to replace it. While looking through the remnant section of Jo Anns, I found some upholstery fabric that i liked! And I decided that this is the time to spice up our old couch. I made two pillow covers out of the fabric.

First I measured the pillow, they are about 18 by 18, so i cut one 20×20 square, then two 20 x 15 rectangles.

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For the two rectangles, I did a double fold under for the hem on one 20-inch edge. I then overlapped those edges and put them right side in against the 20-inch square.

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I was able to sew one continuous seam around the outside edge of the square. Then I snipped the corners flat and flipped it right side out using the overlapped fabric gap.

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Finally I put the old pillows into the new cases and they look so good! It definitely brightens up the room. I don’t care that they do not match my couch mainly because nothing in my living room matches and secondly because nothing could match these old couches at this point.

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