Homemade Hummus

Everyone who has my hummus loves it and wants the recipe and I am happy to share!

The basic ingredients are below. You can mix and match a variety of ingredients on top of these 6 basics and you will be creating hummus. Another popular one I made is a 6 pepper hummus that adds crushed red pepper, bell pepper, banana pepper, jalapeno, black pepper and cayenne. In the past I’ve left the tahini out for a friend who wasn’t partial to it, the texture and taste are a bit off from traditional hummus, but it’s still delicious. Another time I left out chick peas and only used black beans, once again you aren’t making a traditional hummus base, but it is still very good.

Basic Hummus:

  • tahini
  • chick peas
  • garlic
  • paprika
  • cumin
  • salt and pepper

For my black bean hummus I use the following proportions:

  • 1/4 cup tahini (If you leave tahini out, you will need more olive oil.)
  • 1 can chick peas (You can leave out chick peas and double the black beans.)
  • 1 can black beans
  • 1/4 c minced garlic (Yes, that much!)
  • half of a bell pepper (Red is best, all I had this week was green.)
  • green onions (I’m eating this hummus as I write this, and I did not use enough green onions, use 5-6.)
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • olive oil (not pictured)
  • salt and pepper to taste (Remember that your canned beans have a bit of salt already.)

Note: I added cayenne pepper because I love spicy and the wine pictured is for the cook.

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Step 1: Cut fresh green onions from your garden. Oh, you don’t have any? Well if you do buy onions for this recipe, use my method here and you will have your own fresh onions for next time.

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Step 2: Get out your food processor, because you totally have one. In the past I have made hummus in a blender, it requires a lot of stirring to get the hummus off the sides of the container as you blend. I imagine a nutria-bullet would do a good job as well.  I use the small bowl to make the hummus, in hind site I should have used the large one.

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Step 3: Drain and rinse your beans. You don’t need all that canned bean mess in your hummus.

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Step 4: Add the beans and tahini to the processor and start it up!

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Step 5: Add olive oil as needed through out the process to get a smooth mixture. You probably won’t need more than a 1/4 cup, water helps too but doesn’t give the same texture or taste.

Step 6: Add in all the other ingredients, as the food processor is running, until everything is mixed and at the consistency you desire.

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All done! Now package your hummus.

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Since I LOVE spicy food  I packed my hummus adding crushed red pepper and cayenne on top for my daily snack.  I left the bulk of the hummus without spice so I can share when guests come over. If you are plating this for a potluck, I recommend a cilantro and parsley garnish. I highly recommend eating this hummus with pretzel chips or carrots.

Regrow Green Onions at Home

Green Onions!!!!! are one of my favorite foods. Did you know that you can grow the grocery store green onions in your own home? Simply buy a bunch or two, cut from 1-1/2 inch from the roots, and plant.

First option is to grow in a glass (or wine glass for aesthetic reasons) with less than 1/2 inch of water. If you do not add any plant food, you will get 1-2 sets of new growth before it wilts. I have used indoor plant food (just a tiny bit) or coffee grounds (a pinch) to feed my onions and results are better.  I’ve also used left over flower food that they attach to bouquets.  It is easy to flood the onions and cause mold. If you’re just trying it out, I’d go with minimal water and monitor closely to refill. If you are lazy and will forget, just make sure only the roots are covered with water. The image shown below is the first growth after the initial cut.

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Another option is to plant the green onions into a pot. I used a mix of potting soil left over from the summer and some of our compost, with a few extra coffee grounds on top. I then punched a hole with my finger, put in the onion with the top exposed and pushed dirt around the plant so that the onion was tucked in nicely. Shown below are the onions after first new growth from the original cut. Half of the onions were harvested for last night’s burritos.

I have also planted the onions outside with GREAT success in cooler weather; they last a few weeks past first frost. Green onions do not do so well in the humidity of summer though, and will wilt quickly. Over time the base of the onion will form into a bulb and these are easy to replant anywhere needed.

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More information on the green onion: http://www.food.com/library/green-onion-363

I’ve also had mediocre success with replanting romaine lettuce.  Cut the bottom 1-inch up and plant in a glass until new growth is 3-4 inches, then plant outside. It wasn’t quite as satisfying as the green onions because results are slower.

Also check out this post on growing your own garlic from store bought: http://aquaberrybliss.com/2015/01/10/sprouting-garlic/